One thing that makes social media marketing powerful is consumers’ trust in “people like them”—their friends, family and other online peers.

(c) Facebook

(c) Facebook

Marketers want to tap into that trust through the power of earned media or by engaging in a conversation with consumers, but where social conversations take place has an effect on their perceived trustworthiness as well as who is taking part in them.

A study of frequent social media users by market research firm Invoke Solutions found that the most trusted information was posted by people respondents knew. But blog posts were more likely to be trusted “completely” than posts on Facebook, and trust dropped off sharply when it came to Twitter, even among friends.

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MyYearbook and Ketchum published recently the results of  a survey on teen social media users.

Image representing myYearbook as depicted in C...

Image via CrunchBase

It showed that Online Influencers are more likely than the average teen to participate in social media activities by updating their status at least once per day. But the study also shows, that they are sending 3,000 texts per month and spending more time socializing and influencing their peers offline. Social media teen influencers are defined as the top 15% most active and most engaged teens in the myYearbook community. Read more

Social Media Landscape

A majority of social marketers don’t have a formal social-media strategy, according to a study from Digital Brand Expressions. Companies have indefinite ideas about how they want to use social tools, but then fail to explicitly think through and communicate the methods and metrics they want to use. “This leaves the majority of organizations exposed to problems arising from employees saying the wrong things in the wrong ways to the wrong people at the wrong time,” the report notes.

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